What Are The Health Risks Of Smoking?




Smoking causes cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease, heart attack, heart failure, stroke, and aneurysm. Smoking also causes heart disease, stroke, aneurysm of the aorta (balloon-like bulge in an artery in the chest), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (chronic bronchitis and emphysema), diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and cataracts, and it also worsens asthma symptoms in adults.



Cigarette smoking also increases your risk for lung and heart diseases, such as COPD. Cigar smoking can also lead to cancers of the lungs and larynx, with a lower increased risk compared to cigarettes.



Cigar smoking also causes acute myeloid leukemia and increases breast cancer risk. Smoking also has an impact on insulin, making you more likely to develop insulin resistance.

Read More - Tobacco Kills One Person Every 34 Seconds In The Americas

Secondhand smoke also has a major impact on the health of your family members, friends, and coworkers. Smoking also increases your risk for lung infections like pneumonia and tuberculosis, and can make certain existing lung diseases, like asthma, worse. In addition to increasing your risk for kidney cancer, smoking may contribute to further kidney damage. Smoking may also affect your sperm, reducing fertility and increasing your risk for miscarriage and birth defects.



Smoking affects not just your cardiovascular health, but that of others around you who are non-smokers. Smoking tobacco damages your heart and blood vessels (the cardiovascular system), increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke. Smoking tobacco introduces not just nicotine, but over 5,000 chemicals, including many carcinogens (cancer-causing chemicals), to your lungs, blood, and organs. Cigarette smoking causes decreased circulation by clogging the blood vessels (arteries) and puts smokers at risk for peripheral vascular disease (i.e., blockages in major arteries of your arms and legs, which can cause a number of problems ranging from pain to tissue loss to gangrene).

Health Effects Of Cigarette Smoking



Smoking cigarettes impacts your respiratory system, your cardiovascular system, your reproductive system, your skin, and your eyes, and increases your risk for a number of different types of cancer. Although smoking cigarettes causes a greater cancer risk than cigar smoking, cigar smokers still have a higher risk for a number of health problems, including cancer, when compared with non-smokers. Cigar smokers experience many of the same potential risks that cigarette smokers do, including cancer.



Cigar smoking can also lead to cancers of the lungs and larynx, with a reduced increased risk than cigarettes. Cigars do indeed carry risks similar to cigarettes, if not greater, for mouth cancer. Cigar smoking, when compared with non-smokers, is much more likely to cause mouth, oesophageal, and laryngeal cancers.



Cigarette smokers are 30%-40% more likely than nonsmokers to develop type-2 diabetes, with risk increasing as cigarettes are consumed. Female smokers older than 35 years of age are at a slightly greater risk than male smokers for dying of heart disease.



In both genders, smoking 1 - 4 cigarettes a day was associated with significantly higher risks of dying of ischaemic heart disease and of all causes (in both genders), and, in women, of lung cancer. Discussion Principal Findings In men and women who smoked 1 to 4 cigarettes per day, the risk of dying from ischaemic heart disease and all causes was clearly increased. Adjusted relative risks in women smoking 3-5 cigarettes/day were 2.14 for both fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarctions, and 1.86 for all-cause mortality, when adjusted by smoking status.



Table 4 Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) for death from all causes, ischemic heart disease, all cancers, and lung cancer by smoking prevalence over a five-year period, estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for age and cigarettes* Table 5 shows participants who reported at first screening as never having been a smoker, or as having smoked 1 - 4 cigarettes daily, and turned up to the follow-up at 10 years. Table 4, and Table 1, indicate that had smoking duration been of equal length in the light smokers compared with those of people in other smoking groups, light smokers would have had an even higher relative risk than reported in Table 3, from approximately 7 percent for ischaemic heart disease to approximately 47 percent for lung cancer for women.



Table 4, and table 1, show that if duration of smoking in the light smokers had been of the same length as for persons in other consumption groups, light smokers relative risk would have been even higher than that reported in table 3, ranging from about 7 % for ischaemic heart disease to about 47 % for lung cancer in women.7 Although, no data suggest smoking improved disease outcomes for people who had developed ulcerative colitis.8,9 In addition, heavy cigarette smokers had an increased risk of developing Crohns disease, another intestinal inflammatory disorder (see section 3,12.2). Smoking increases the risk of symptoms associated with Crohns disease (a dose-response effect when more than 15 cigarettes a day). People who smoke increase their risk of heart disease -- it is the leading cause of death in both women and men in the U.S.



Smoking tobacco damages your heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular system), increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke. Cardiovascular System Smoking damages your whole cardiovascular system. Smoking damages almost all the organs of your body, causes a variety of diseases, and generally decreases health.



Smoking tobacco not only puts nicotine, but also over 5,000 chemicals, including many carcinogens (cancer-causing chemicals), in your lungs, blood, and organs. Tobacco use also causes many other diseases and can damage almost all the organs of your body, including the lungs, heart, blood vessels, reproductive organs, mouth, skin, eyes, and bones. Smokeless tobacco contains a variety of cancer-causing toxins, and using it increases your risk for head, neck, throat, oesophagus, and mouth cancers (including mouth, tongue, lip, and gum cancer), as well as various dental diseases.



Smoking also increases the risk for a variety of other oral diseases, some almost entirely unique to tobacco users. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cigarette smoking increases your risk of death from all causes, not just from those related to tobacco use.



In addition to the known risks to developing cancer, smoking causes a number of other chronic (long-term) health problems, which require continuous treatment. Smoking also increases your risk for lung infections like pneumonia and tuberculosis, and can make certain existing lung diseases, like asthma, worse. Damage caused by smoking in the lungs may result in severe, long-term lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).


Smoking causes





 
Smoking causes various continuing complications throughout your body, in addition to having a lasting impact on your system. Smoking also causes heart disease, stroke, an aortic aneurysm (a balloon-like bulge in the artery of your chest), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (chronic bronchitis and emphysema), diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and cataracts, as well as aggravated asthma symptoms in adults. Smoking also increases your risk for peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which occurs when arteries to your arms and legs begin to narrow, restricting blood flow.



Smoking causes elevated blood pressure, reduces your ability to exercise, and makes it easier for blood to clot. Cigarette smoking causes inflammation and cellular damage across your body, and it weakens your immune system, making you less able to fight off diseases. In fact, smoking is the number one preventable death in the U.S. In the U.S., smokers have a death rate that is three times higher than that of non-smokers.



Polish researchers found that obese women showed the greatest reduction in risk for current smoking (OR 0.47; 95% CI, 0.27-9.81), a finding that further highlights the need for caution in interpreting these beneficial effects of smoking, given the toxic and carcinogenic effects of tobacco.33 Smoking women may also have a reduced risk of uterine fibroids and endometriosis, but evidence for this is not convincing.32, 34 The development of endometrial cancer is primarily influenced by exposure to the hormone oestrogen, and the protection conferred by smoking is likely due to the antioestrogen effects of chemicals in tobacco smoke.

Post a Comment

0 Comments